Engineers from the University of Utah created a revelation of a new material that could one day facilitate jewelry and body heat to generate enough electricity to power a body sensor, or enable a cooking pan to charge a cell phone. The team found that a combination of the chemical elements calcium, cobalt and terbium can create a powerful, inexpensive and bio-friendly material that can generate electricity through a thermoelectric process involving heat and cold air. The material is said to need less than a one-degree difference in temperature to produce a noticeable voltage.


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There was an article posted on New Electronics on February 14, 2017 that talks about FPGA having a high data rate and low power capability. The FPGA from Microsemi has their Polarfire which has the ability to boast 12.7 gbit/s with its transceiver while also consuming less power which is less than 90 mW at 10Gbit/s speeds. Here is what Bruce Meyer, the vice president and business unit manager at Microsemi, has to say about the FPGA. “For the first time, we can offer a non-volatile FPGA that features 10Gbit/s transceivers and which provides tangible power and cost benefits over SRAM FPGAs.”


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Microchip Technology Inc. provides microcontrollers and analog semiconductors for different applications worldwide. It became a leading service provider by catering to the needs of a wide variety of consumers. To increase its market even further, Microchip has begun selling an RF transceiver which supports the Sigfox wide area for Internet of Things networks. The stand-alone ATA8520E transceiver is FCC-certified and comes with an AVR micro controller. It also comes with the option of an Xplained PRO development board that is also FCC-certified. What brings users to Sigfox is the lower node power connections that are not available with Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. As of today, there are more than 8 million devices already part of the ISM unlicensed network which operates in 24 countries.


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There are two types of currents, direct current and alternating currents. Any piece of equipment that utilizes an electric current in order to function eventually has to have direct current passing through it. The current we receive from the electric company and passes through the wires throughout the city and into our homes is an Alternating current. So what the technology industries do, basically any device that uses an electric current and receives a power input from the electric company has an electric circuit that converts alternating current into a direct current and then the current can pass through and power on which ever device you are working with. Linear technology has been able to come up with an RMS power detector which uses a root-mean-square function to measure an accurate estimate of the RF signal. The Direct Current output will give an accurate estimate of an RF Signal that is accurate to the tenth of dB.


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A new QM series of an AC DC power supplies have been introduced by TDK.  TDK Corporation has created the first 1200 W to 1500W rated modular series to have MoPPs isolated allows for it to have the lowest “acoustic noise “that is offered at that power level in the market. The latest series is certified by both the medical and industrial industries to allow for it to be used and placed in many applications. Many popular applications that the QM series can be embedded in are


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Teledyne LeCroy has introduced a HDO9000 range of oscilloscopes to the industry that is equipped with HD1024 technology features. Designed and manufactured to,  “automatically determine the best A/D converter configuration under each measurement condition to optimize vertical resolution, extending up to 13.8bits.”


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Intersil released an article discussing how the company is planning to introduce high current buck boost regulators for their battery powered portables. These buck boost regulators are considered to be ISL91127 and ISL91128. These new buck boost family devices had 4.5A switches which brings efficiency percentages up to 96 as well as having a compact footprint ideal for providing system power.


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Texas Instruments, the American electronics company which makes and designs semiconductors, has recently achieved the fastest 14bit ADC ever, with “one that works at 3Gsample/s, delivering an instantaneous 1.5GHz-per-channel bandwidth, enabling engineers to implement wide-band in-phase and quadrature-component receivers beyond 2.5 GHz,” said the company.


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A group of US and Israeli scientists were brought together to help develop with the world’s tiniest diode. The diode is formed from the size of a single molecule of DNA that is unseen by a conventional microscope.


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Light chips being developed by researchers could soon lead to more energy-efficient data centers through existing manufacturing technology. A top team of researchers at MIT, University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Colorado, Boulder have teamed together to create the chip that could end up helping the environment tremendously.


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